Thursday Doors August 24: Roma Sampler

As it goes with the 2300+ photos I shot whilst in Italy, I sort thru, and sort thru again, and again…. well, you get my point. I have enough to post on my blog for months perhaps, but wouldn’t want to overdo it on Italy (is there ever such a thing, I wonder??) 🙂

For today’s doors, a few from Rome. While I focused on Trastevere, a rione (district) of Rome, in a previous post, I’ve not visited my overall Roma collection of doors. Here, a diverse mix.

For Norm’s Thursday Doors Challenge.

Thursday Doors, July 6: A tale of two Italian towns

My last two hill towns of Italy left me with a sense that surely nothing could surpass them (though, my friend Manja tells me that’s just not so – I’ll have to believe her, for now 🙂 … )

Orvieto and Civita di Bagnoregio, the last of my Italy destinations, dished out a lovely assortment of doors (and more).

For Norm Frampton’s Thursday Doors challenge

Trastevere: It feels just like it sounds…


…but just be sure to speak it in Italian, not American…

I had read about Trastevere before we left for our trip – so when Marco and Manja suggested it part of our day long trek around Rome, I knew it wouldn’t disappoint.

I should mention, all of the places we I visited had scrumptuous street art – including doors and windows, that qualify as art to me. I’ve decided to post most street art, door, and window captures separately. They each deserve their own.

However, a good bit of it speaks to the flair and verve of each of the neighborhoods, towns, and cities we visited. So I’ll include ones that were standouts.

Tears
Street art.
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Trastevere.
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All over Italy, water fountains run freely (some, have a spigot), which you can rinse your hands off, fill your water bottle, or water your dog. The water in Italy – not surprising as they know how to do water, historically – was delicious.
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Charming Trastevere (if you find me using the word “charm” in any form on Italy posts too much, well, get over it. 🙂
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Piazza di Santa Maria
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I sure wish hanging laundry out windows to dry looked like this at home!

Trastevere also has a spectacular church – you’d never know it by it’s relatively plain Jane exterior: The Basilica of Santa Maria, stunning. After seeing St Paul’s huge glorious-ness, we shifted gears to a more modest (well, not really) size. The basic floor plan and structure dates back to the 340’s. Yes. That’s the year three hundred forty. 

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Basilica di Santa Maria
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Basilica di Santa Maria
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Basilica di Santa Maria

We ate gelato. I should mention that. By the end of our trip, we had a ranking for our top five places.

gelato
Oh Gelato, we love you so.

Manja snuck in a picture of me doing my thing. It was a treat having a fellow photographer with us!

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Manja’s snap of my snap.

 

 

Exploring the fringe of Rome with new friends

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Emily, Me, Manja and Marco (Shawn behind the camera). Can you tell we loved our gelato? Marco is the only one taking his time 🙂

Who’d have thought we’d get the royal treatment from two people we’d never met in person? And yet, here were Manja and Marco (now our good friends, I should add) spending a delightful day by driving us all around to some off the beaten path, and amazing, sites in Rome.

First up was the Protestant, or Non-Catholic, cemetery (“Cimitero Acattolico”)…

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The “Angel of Grief” is an 1894 sculpture by William Wetmore Story which serves as the grave stone of the artist and his wife.
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John Keats is one of the more well-known people buried here, though his tombstone, paired with this nearby plaque, is a riddle that requires both to identify him.
Cemetary
Very lush with trees, shrubs, flowers; tiered with eclectic nooks and crannies all around the grave sites.

 

Catcemetary
The cemetery is also a cat sanctuary.

After the cemetery, Marco using his mad Rome driving skills, we headed for Gianicolo Hill, as every day at noon a cannon fires. We didn’t make it in time, so instead went to Basilica of St Paul Outside the Walls. The 25 or so churches we saw were phenomenal – there are more than 900 in Rome alone!

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Girls with cameras rock!
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Entering St Paul’s thru a gorgeous, massive marble columned walkway.
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The Basilica, built around the 4th century AD (finished ~1800)
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Small font – most baptismal fonts we saw were large and elaborate.
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Beautiful art and architecture.
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Basilica selfies 😉

I almost forgot – the most important highlight of the day (and every day): FOOD!

lunch
We ate at a yummy Sicilian restaurant (serious dining here, can’t you tell), Marco’s work lunch digs!
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And conveniently, where we ate lunch was a pasticceria too (pastry shop!)
cappucino
Macchiato.  I broke the golden rule of having milk in my coffee in the afternoon. It’s all about digestion in Italy (espresso/alcohol after a meal)  Aside from a cappuccino or the like at breakfast, it’s espresso or bust after that! Also, there is a very clear reason why Starbucks doesn’t exist in Italy.  I’ll speak more about Italian coffee in a future post, as it clearly deserves its own accolades!
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Granita for Emily and me – Shawn – fancy iced coffee I think!
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Chillin’ with the best world travelers one could find.
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We ate gelato. Oh, did we eat gelato. But walking 7-10 miles a day warranted it!
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We finished a long and awesome day with pizza. It was delish!